Friday, December 27

David Doyle’s December duo decidedly divert diligent desk-bound diorama devotees...dis-month

I mean that’s the best headline alliteration I could come up with in a short time – and it is far from the point really that Mr Doyle has penned and provided the pictures for tow of Squadron’s late 2013 titles on two very popular subjects from Squadron/Signal, Productions..

December/ January Releases from Squadron /Signal Productions

David Doyle.
The Grumman F8F Bearcat represents the pinnacle of US carrier-borne piston-engine fighter design. Marrying a compact, lightweight airframe with a powerful 18-cylinder Pratt & Whitney Double Wasp radial engine churning out more than 2,000 horsepower produced an aircraft intended to be an interceptor that could operate from the smallest escort carriers. While the Bearcat prototype first took to the air in August 1944, and the first squadron equipped with the new fighters was operational in May 1945, the war ended before the Bearcat actually saw combat in World War II. The type would ultimately see combat in the First Indochina War. Visually chronicles this diminutive fighter with ample images and captures the nuances of this famed warbird.

Illustrated with 179 photographs (89 vintage black-and-white photos, 13 color photos from the same time period, and 77 further color photos of preserved aircraft) plus five color profiles and 17 detailed line drawings; 80 pages.

David Doyle.
Collectively known as the M19 Heavy Tank Transporter, this truck and trailer combination was conceived at the behest of British in 1941, and was later used by the United States Army as well. The prime mover for the combination was the Diamond T model 980 or 981 12-ton truck, known as the M20, while the 45-ton capacity full trailer it towed was designated the M9. The combination saw widespread use during World War II, and well into the post-war years. Explores the development, use, and details of these wartime workhorses.

Illustrated with 222 photographs (64 black-and-white vintage photographs in conjunction with 158 detailed full-color photos of immaculately preserved examples); 80 pages.

These books are now available at  the Squadron Webstore!

Squadron/Signal Publication's November 2013 Releases..

SS10220   F4U Corsair in Action (SC)  $18.95
SS50220   F4U Corsair in Action (HB)  $28.95

Author Jim Sullivan
Illustrated with 229 photographs, plus color profiles and detailed line drawings; 80 pages. ISBN 978-0-89747-623-2 Softback / ISBN 978-0-89747-743-7 Hardcover

Updated and expanded with 53 exciting new photographs in 16 all new, additional pages. Bringing to mind the exploits of 'Pappy' Boyington and his 'Blacksheep Squadron' and Tommy Blackburn with the 'Jolly Rogers,' the Corsair is among the most formidable US fighters of World War II. The F4U maintained a kill ratio of 11:1 according to the United States Navy and went on to serve American forces in Korea, holding its own in the early years of the jet age. The Corsair was first conceived as a high-speed, high-altitude fighter for the Navy in 1938 when Chance Vought’s design team drew up plans for a fighter with a 1,800 hp engine and a huge 13-foot propeller. The Corsair's famous inverted gull wing design was introduced to allow prop clearance. Handling problems delayed the aircraft’s deployment aboard carriers, but Marine Corps pilots quickly took to the powerful, rugged fighter and VMF-124, the first Marine squadron to fly the Corsair in combat, also produced the first Corsair air ace, Kenneth A. Walsh, by the summer of 1943. A total of 12,571 Corsairs were built between 1940 and 1952, most of them by Vought, but hundreds by Goodyear and Brewster as those companies' assembly lines had to be pressed into service to meet soaring demand for the remarkable aircraft. This exhaustive volume surveys the history of the Corsair from its first prototype to the restored warbirds that have continued to delight air show audiences down to the present day.

SS10232     PBY Catalina in Action (SC)  $18.95
SS50232     PBY Catalina in Action (HB)  $28.95

Author David Doyle
Illustrated with more than 210 photographs; 80 pages. ISBN = 978-0-89747-740-6 Softcover / ISBN = 978-0-89747-739-0 Hardcover

The iconic PBY Catalina was not only the work horse of the U.S. Navy's patrol bomber units during World War II, but also served admirably with the Royal Air Force, Royal Canadian Air Force, and others. Airmen aboard British PBYs were the first to spot the German battleship Bismarck when it broke out into the North Atlantic in May 1941, and U.S. Navy PBY crewmen were the first to observe the Japanese fleet as it stole towards Midway Islands in June 1942. In addition to keeping a watchful eye out for enemy activities, Catalina crews also rescued countless downed airmen as well as sailors from stricken ships. Through daring bomb and depth-charge attacks on enemy vessels, Catalina airmen also contributed directly to the defeat of the Axis powers in combat. This all-new 80-page volume from Squadron tells the story of the Catalina through over 200 vintage photos, over 30 of which are in colour, as well as eight colour profiles and numerous detailed line drawings. 
John Adams-Graf.
80 pages.
Illustrated with more than 225 photographs;
Sale Price: $17.06 SC / $26.06 H/C

In 2006, President George Bush declared it 'priority number one,' to defeat the threat of improvised explosive devices. This volume describes the military's rapid response in developing and deploying mine-resistant ambush-protected vehicles that ultimately overcame the threat of roadside bombs in Iraq and Afghanistan. Presents in detail all the major MRAPs: RG-31s, RG-33s, Cougars, Caimans, MaxxPros and MATVs. Also included are the early deployed M1117 ASVs as well as Husky and Buffalo route-clearance vehicles. Colour photography and detailed captions take the mystery out of identifying the myriad US-deployed MRAP vehicles, first deployed in 2006 and continue to protect service men and women.
80 pages.
Illustrated with over 200 photographs - including 143 vintage photos and 74 color photos;
Sale Price: $17.06 SC / $26.06 H/C

Conceived at a time when the US Army was seeking to revolutionize its tactical vehicle fleet, the Gama Goat showed considerable promise. Deriving its name from its designer, Roger Gamaunt, the Gama Goat was initially a project of aerospace giant Chance-Vought. The all-wheel drive vehicle with steerable axles at each end and a flexible connection between the halves of its two-part body provide agile in testing. The flexibility gave the vehicle sure footing, and the body was designed to be amphibious. Sadly, the production M561 Gama Goats, assembled by Consolidated Diesel Electric, failed to live up to the promise of the test vehicles, leading to a Congressional investigation into both the vehicle performance and cost overruns. Expense modifications and retrofitting delayed the fielding of the vehicle. Troops using these engineering marvels either loved it, or hated it, with seemingly no middle ground. Ultimately, the vehicle saw use with US forces stateside, as well as in Germany and Korea, and the M561 was used during the invasion of Grenada. Chronicles the design, development, testing and field use of this iconic vehicle, as well as showcasing the nuances of the remarkable design with images of immaculately preserved examples.

These books are now available at  the Squadron Webstore!

Squadron/Signal Publication's September 2013 Releases..
Packed with over 150 photos,
10 colour profiles
full-page general arrangement plans for each of the major classes.
Illustrated with 158 photographs; 
80 pages.

Larger, faster and more powerful than Allied counterparts, the Schnellboot was perhaps the best motor torpedo boat of WWII. Unlike mass-produced Allied boats, Germany spared no expense in equipping the Schnellboot with the speed, protection, manoeuvrability and firepower to strike and survive in increasingly hostile seas.  Operating under the cover of darkness and using cutting-edge technology, the Schnellboot remained a menace to the last days of WWII, long after all other Kriegsmarine surface combatants had been neutralized.  This book is an informative and richly-illustrated technical history of these sleek, powerful vessels, from the first to the final variants. It includes detailed information on weapons, electronics, optics, engines, camouflage, and more. This new edition has been enlarged, corrected and augmented with many new photos, in-depth captions, additional color profiles, and all-new, meticulously-detailed scale drawings.

David Doyle

Illustrated with 285 photographs
Detailed line drawings
colour profiles
128 pages.

The keel of the 35,000-ton battleship Alabama was laid in Norfolk Naval Shipyard in 1940. Labourers swarmed to build the immense vessel as war raged elsewhere in the globe. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, their work took on new urgency, and the mighty battleship was placed in commission on 16 August 1942. Her first duties included bolstering the British Home Fleet, to protect convoys from such famed German surface raiders as Tirpitz, Scharnhorst and Admiral Scheer. By late 1943 Alabama was operating with the US fleet in the Pacific, her powerful anti-aircraft battery, which was frequently  augmented, putting up a shield over US carriers and her 16-inch guns firing on Japanese shore positions. This book documents all of these events through more than 200 vintage photos, illustrating these actions, as well as her construction and frequent refitting, before concluding with coverage of her years in the Navy's 'mothball fleet' and the saga of her preservation as a memorial. The extensive array of archival photos is augmented by detailed line drawings and colour profiles illustrating her varied camouflage schemes. 

These books are now available at a decent 10% off the price listed above – so get in fast before that discount disappears…. At the Squadron Webstore!

Squadron/ Signal Publication's July 2013 Releases..

Kliment. - Illustrated with more than 186 photographs, detailed line drawings and color profiles; 80 pages.

The tank that has gone down in history as the Pz.Kpfw.38(t) was originally christened the LT vz. 38 or 'Light Tank model 38' by its Czechoslovak manufacturers before World War II. Intended for the Czechoslovak armed forces, its early models were also supplied to Sweden, Iran, Peru, and Switzerland, and saw action during the 1941 conflict between Peru and Ecuador. But like the Czech lands themselves, the tank and its industrial producers were seized by Nazi Germany when Hitler's forces took over the Central European country on the eve of World War II. Pressed into German service, the Pz.Kpfw.38(t), as the vehicle was renamed, became one of the most widely used Czechoslovak fighting vehicles. The Pz.Kpfw.38(t) saw extensive action during Germany’s invasions of Poland in 1939 and France in 1940. The tank accounted for a significant part of the armored units that poured across the Soviet frontier on 22 June 1941. The excellent chassis was later used as a basis for tank hunters, self-propelled artillery, and antiaircraft vehicles, and in the last year of the war for a Jagdpanzer 38 'Hetzer.'
ISBN 978-0-89747-726-0 Softcover / ISBN 978-0-89747-725-3 Hardcover

Putnikov.- Illustrated with 196 photographs, color profiles and numerous detailed line drawings. 80 pages.

For the 30 years the Saab 37 Viggen thundered over Sweden, a resolute deterrent against any potential aggression. Named for the thunderclap that resounded when the god Thor banged his hammer, and developed to replace the Saab 32 Lansen as an attacker and Saab 35 Draken as a fighter, Viggen was designed as a multirole combat aircraft capable of perfuming fighter, strike and reconnaissance duties. Saab adopted a novel and extremely advanced aerodynamic configuration of a main delta wing combined with delta-shaped foreplanes. Viggen became the first canard-equipped military aircraft to enter production since aviation's 'stick-and-string' days. Viggen easily met the strict Swedish Air Force specification of combat operations from 500-meter runways and public roads - a performance standard that few other attack jets in the world could equal. Significantly, the Viggen was the first aircraft to be equipped with both afterburner and reverse trust. Continually upgraded during its career, the Viggen produced a number of variants, including a two-seater trainer as well as photo-reconnaissance, ground-attack, and all-weather interceptor versions, which came to an end with the last Viggen flight in Swedish military service in June 2007. This volume contains photos published here for the first time, as well as detailed drawings based on original Saab technical manuals. Outstanding among the few publications in the world devoted to Saab 37, this book will be of interest to modelers and aircraft enthusiasts alike.
ISBN 978-0-89747-717-8 Softcover / ISBN 978-0-89747-716-1 Hardcover

Doyle. I Illustrated with 237 photographs; 80 pages

n the early days of World War II, the US Army developed many specialized vehicles based on the standard US halftrack chassis. One such vehicle, the M3 Gun Motor Carriage, was engineered to be a self-propelled antitank gun, melding the venerable 75mm 1897A4 cannon - the famed 'French 75' -  with the then-modern halftrack chassis built by Autocar. The ever-increasing armor protection of German tanks combined with advances in fully-tracked tank destroyers led the Army to eschew the vehicle after limited use in Europe, notably in Sicily.  The US Marines, however, used the vehicle in several campaigns in the Pacific, where the Marines brought the canon to bear on comparatively thin Japanese armor as well as bunkers. Chronicles the development and combat use of the M3 Gun Motor Carriage through vintage photos, as well as thoroughly documenting the only fully restored example in existence through an additional full-color images.

ISBN 978-0-89747-728-4 Softcover / ISBN 978-0-89747-727-7 Hardcover

May 2013 Releases..
by David Doyle.
Designed by Jack Northrop and Vladimir Pavlecka in response to a secret Army Air Corps request, the P-61, dubbed the Black Widow, became not only America's first purpose-built night fighter, but also the largest and most heavily-armed operational fighter flown by the United States during World War II.  Despite being the size of a medium bomber, the unique control surfaces of the P-61 made it surprisingly agile, and among its many successes is downing of the final enemy aircraft of the war. This book tells the story of the Black Widow from the experimental XP-61 on through the final production variant, the F-15A, through black and white photos and vintage colour photos, augmented by four colour profiles and detailed line drawings.

Illustrated with 164 black and white and 30 vintage colour photographs, four colour profiles, and a dozen line drawings.

80 pages.
Paperback ISBN 978-0-89747-719-2,
Hardcover ISBN 978-0-89747-718-5.

This book is now available at a decent 10% off the price listed above – so get in fast before that discount disappears…. At the Squadron Webstore!

Squadron/Signal Publications previous titles.

By Jim Mesko
The M8 'Greyhound' armored car was the only armored car used in substantial numbers by US forces during World War II. The M20, an offshoot of the M8 design, also played a number of active roles, in particular serving as a command car for high-ranking officers in forward areas. Both vehicles, manufactured by the Ford Motor Company, went on, after World War II, serving US and various Allied forces around the world. Some countries were still using the vehicles at the turn of the 21st century. The M8 featured an open-top turret in which was mounted an M6 37mm cannon and coaxial Browning .30-caliber machine gun. The M20 replaced the turret with an open-topped parapet with a ring-mounted .50-caliber machine gun. When serving as a command car, the M20 packed additional radios and a folding map board. This lavishly illustrated volume is packed with contemporary and historic images that document not only the vehicles' configurations as produced, but also their appearance and activity in the field - the most unique collection of detailed photos of the Greyhound currently available.

Illustrated with over 250 photographs, color profiles and detailed line drawings; 80 pages.

By David Doyle

The USS Lexington - affectionately referred to as 'Lady Lex' - was the United States Navy's second aircraft carrier. Laid down as the lead ship of the Lexington-class battle cruisers, which were to have been the world’s most powerful warships, the Washington Naval Treaty forbade her completion as such, but permitted her to be finished as an aircraft carrier. Commissioned 14 December 1927, Lexington, with her fabric-covered biplanes deployed to the Pacific. Through the following years both the ship and her aircraft underwent numerous upgrades. These changes, along with her construction, the daily routine of the crew are fully chronicled. The book also describes the transition of both men and machine as the nation plunged into the war, which ended for the Lexington on 8 May 1942, when she sank in the Coral Sea. No other single volume encompasses all the historic images that pack this latest volume.
Illustrated with 235 photos, 14 color renderings and detailed line drawings; 104 pages.

These two are actually on sale now as a startup offer for 10% - just click their links above if you want these for a few dollars less….

Squadron Signal Publications in December 2012

As it became increasingly apparent that the United States could not avoid getting involved in World War II, the US Army stepped up its efforts at modernization and industrial mobilization. Toward this end, the Quartermaster Corps ordered a series of 4-ton 6x6 trucks from Chicago-based Diamond T Motor Car Company. The chassis of the artillery prime mover was adapted for use a dump truck, a long-wheelbase truck to transport bridging equipment, and what would become the US Army's standard medium wrecker during WWII. The design of the Diamond T was so successful that it is widely recognized as the forerunner of the Army’s post-WWII M-series trucks, which were utilized for 50 years. For this book, the finest preserved examples of the classic Diamond T were sought out and extensively photographed, resulting in a volume packed with colour photographs augmented by five period black-and-white photos.

Illustrated with 232 photographs; 80 pages.

by David Doyle

The USS Texas proudly saw combat in both World Wars I and II, and since 1948 has been preserved in her namesake state as memorial to American servicemen.  Armed with 10 14-inch guns and displacing 32,000 tons, the battleship is still a formidable sight as she enters into her second century. This expansive volume tells the tale of the Texas and her crew. Loaded with black-and-white and colour photos not only showcase the construction, numerous voyages, modifications, combat action, and ultimate preservation of the ship, but also show the vessel as a home, office, and workshop for the men who served as her crew. These historic images are augmented with five line drawings illustrating her key configurations, as well as nine colour profiles depicting her aircraft, as well as the many camouflage schemes she wore.

Illustrated with over 350 photographs; 152 pages.

Both hardcover and softcover are available now from Squadron/Signal Productions. (They are also currently 10% off so get in fast)

Also an amazing thing to check out is Squadron’s Mystery Deal every day – The other day it was a 1/35 Tri-Star Brumbar kit only a year just released for US$11.99!! Keep clicking every day for other amazing stuff.

New from Squadron S
ignal Publications in December
Neubeck. The first swept-wing carrier-based fighter aircraft built for the US Navy, the F9F Cougar marked a major leap forward in the area of naval aircraft design from its predecessor, the straight-wing Grumman F9F Panther. The prototype of the first version of the Cougar, the F9F-6, first took to the air in September of 1951, just six months after contract award. There were several different models of the Cougar, reflecting its varied uses as well as the general development of the aircraft. The F9F-6 was followed by the F9F-7 and F9F-8. In addition there were also two reconnaissance models - the F9F-6P and the F9F-8P - as well as a two-seater trainer version, the F9F-8T. 

The contemporary photographs in this volume illustrate in detail the differences between the various Cougar models, making use of over a dozen display aircraft located in museums across the United States as well as one Cougar on display in Argentina. Grounded in solid historical research, the book also features historical images from the photo archives of both the U.S. Navy and Grumman, and also includes rare photos of F9F Cougar in its final days, serving as a target drone for later generations of fighters. Illustrated with over 230 photographs; 80 pages.

ISBN 978-0-89747-666-9, softcover; 978-0-89747-667-6, hardcover.

Doyle. In an effort to turn the proverbial lemon, in the form of an unsuccessful Tiger design, into lemonade, Porsche engineers at the behest of the German army, converted the failed chassis into one of the largest and most potent tank destroyer designs of World War II. Initially fielded as the Ferdinand, the vehicles were further modified, and ultimately given a new - and apt - name: 'Elefant.' This new volume explores not only the combat history of both the Ferdinand and Elefant, but also chronicles the development of the ill-fated Porsche Tiger design through 88 period black-and-white photos. 

Further enhancing its utility to the enthusiast, 110 full-colour photos of the only surviving examples of each type illustrate the nuances of the construction and subsequent wartime modification of these giant tank killers. The book also features 16 detailed line drawings as well as 15 masterful colour profiles; 80 pages.

ISBN 978-0-89747-704-8, softcover; 978-0-89747-703-1, hardcover.

New from Squadron Signal Publications in October

By Kenneth Katz
Many air forces can conduct missions such as air superiority and ground attack, but only the US Air Force has truly global reach. For more than five decades, the essential enabler of this global reach has been the KC-135 Stratotanker. Unarmed and unglamorous, the KC-135 has been one of the most successful and enduring aircraft in US Air Force history. Primarily based on the author's extensive access to operational KC-135 aircraft on the ground and in flight, this book the most detailed photographic documentation of the KC-135 inside and out that has ever been published, as well as colour profiles of the KC-135R in the markings of every major USAF command that has operated that variant.

Illustrated with 240 photographs, detailed line drawings and colour profiles; 88 pages.

By David Doyle
Though relatively lightly armoured, Buick's M18 Hellcat could top 55 MPH, making it the fastest armoured fighting vehicle fielded during World War II. The Tank Destroyer men who crewed these vehicles used this speed and the Hellcat's 76mm high-velocity cannon to destroy German tanks; firing at the vulnerable areas of the enemy, and then racing away before coming under fire themselves. This volume examines the three principal variants of the Hellcat - the preproduction T70, early M18, and late M18, using ample visual reference to document these vehicles - and their differences - inside and out. Engine and drive train, driver's compartment, weapons and sighting systems and stowage - both interior and exterior - are all carefully presented.

Illustrated with 230 colour photographs, 5 b/w photographs, 5 line drawings, and 4 profiles; 80 pages.

New from Squadron Signal Publications in September
by David Doyle.
Soaring into the pages of history with Jimmy Doolittle's famed Tokyo Raiders, the North American B-25 Mitchell was the most-produced American medium bomber of World War II. Profusely illustrated, this volume examines the nuances of the external features and explores the inner workings of the B-25D model, the scarce hard-hitting, cannon-armed B-25H, and also the most abundantly-produced Mitchell, the B-25J.  Enhancing the color photographs, taken both on the ground and in the air, four vintage black-and-white images and 14 line drawings further illustrate details, while five color renderings of aircraft and markings provide a glimpse at the nature of the crews. Illustrated with more than 200 photographs; 80 pages.

by Ron Mackay.

The Heinkel 111 saw service on all Germany's military fronts in the European Theater of WWII. The 111 entered the war as a medium bomber, supporting Wehrmacht ground campaigns. After the tide in the conflict had turned against the Reich, and air superiority had been achieved by Allies, the aircraft was largely relegated to transport functions. This iconic warplane had its origins as a cutting-edge civil airliner in the mid-1930s. But war was looming and it was adapted for use as a bomber. The first mass-produced versions, the He 111E and F, served in the Condor Legion with Nationalist forces in the Spanish Civil War, paving the way to further military engagement once WWII broke out. Although produced in large numbers and exported to many countries before and during the war, few examples survive today. This volume features detailed photographic images of the He 111P-1 restored and preserved in Norway, and the He 111H-20 on display in the RAF museum. Illustrated with 228 photos, detailed line drawings and colour profiles; 88 pages.

Both hardcover and softcover are available now from Squadron/Signal Productions. (They are also currently 10% off so get in fast)


New from Squadron/Signal this July

By David Doyle. Illustrated with 220 photographs; 80 pages.
The M151 was intended to be a lightweight, high-mobility replacement for the M38A1, itself a successor to the famed World War II jeep. Dubbed the Military Utility Tactical Truck or "MUTT" by the military - GIs almost universally referred to the vehicle as a "jeep." The series' service life spanned more than 40 years and four manufacturers, and the vehicles saw service everywhere the US GI was deployed. This volume chronicles the development and field use of the M151 series in Europe, the Middle East and, of course, there is extensive coverage of the vehicles' service in Vietnam. The photos, many previously unpublished, are augmented by seven line drawings.

By Wayne Mutza. Illustrated with over 160 photographs; 136 pages.

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, U.S. Army planners sought to increase the Army’s helicopter force. The Army developed new tactical doctrine using helicopters - the airmobile concept - which was based largely on air cavalry units. Such units were descendants of the US Cavalry, which had operated as light, horse-mounted infantry. Air cavalry troopers were, in essence, horse soldiers, and helicopters were their steed. True to their proud and colourful heritage, the Air Cavalry not only employed tactics used by their forefathers of the Indian wars, they embraced their culture as they deployed in the gruelling conflict in Indochina. Packed with more than 30 action packed, often hair raising first-hand accounts of helicopter scout combat in Vietnam, this latest addition takes you into the thick of the action. Besides being exciting reading, these personal recollections by dozens of the fighters themselves provide invaluable, primary source historical coverage of one of America's epic conflicts as experienced by frontline helicopter scouts.

Both of these books are now available at the Squadron Webstore

New releases from Squadron/Signal in June

by David Doyle. 
From bombardier's station to the pads for the tail gunner's knees, this all-new Walk Around explores the Marauder up-close and in detail, surveying the intricacies of Martin's WWII medium bomber in depth. Exclusive photos illustrate the rarely seen inner workings and outer features of the B-26G, with additional coverage of the B-26, B-26B, and B-26C. Initially dubbed "the Widowmaker" due to its high wing loading and high landing speeds. But following refinements in the design and improved crew training, the B-26 ended the war with the lowest loss rate of any USAAF bomber. The B-26 Marauder saw service in Europe, the Mediterranean and the Pacific, including use by the United States, the Free French, the Royal Air Force and the South African Air Force. More than 220 photographs, plus numerous detailed line drawings and colour profiles; 80 pages.
by Chris Hughes. 
First deployed in combat in Vietnam, the M551 Sheridan is the first US tank to be fully amphibious and also airborne capable. Though maintenance problems and issues with the gun-launcher system caused the M551 to be withdrawn from most active Army units in the late 1970s, it continued to serve the 82nd Airborne Division as the only armoured vehicle in the Army’s inventory that could be air dropped. With the 82nd, the Sheridan took part in the U.S. invasion of Panama in 1989 and in the war against Iraq in 1990-1991. The last M551s were withdrawn from U.S. service in 2003. Based on photographic studies of various M551s, volume offers readers the first-ever up close look at the Sheridan. Coverage of the basic M551 begins with the suspension and works its way around the exterior of the tank, into the engine compartment and finishes with a detailed look at the vehicle’s interior. Photos of the sub-variants of the M551 Sheridan, such as the 'Product Improvement Program,' A1, and VISMODs round out this profile of the versatile historic tank. Illustrated by more than 240 photographs plus eight detailed line drawings; 80 pages.

Both hardcover and softcover are available now from Squadron/Signal Productions.

 New from Squadron/Signal in May

by Kenneth Katz

More than any other weapon system, the legendary Boeing B-52 Stratofortress is the embodiment of American military power in the popular imagination. Perhaps the most impressive aspect of the B-52 has been its longevity. The B-52 first flew in 1952 and entered operational service with the U.S. Air Force in 1955. Boeing delivered the last B-52 in 1962. Five decades later, the B-52 remains in front-line service, most recently taking part in combat over Afghanistan and Iraq. Even more amazingly, current plans are for the B-52 to remain in service until 2040. This volume is packed with historical and recent photographs of the B-52, including some that were released by the US Air Force and its contractors just for use in the book. As part of his research, the author flew on a B-52 training mission, and the flight report in this volume is the most detailed description of a B-52 mission ever published. Illustrated with colour profiles, detailed line drawings and over 190 photographs; 88 pages.

Hardcover ISBN = 978-0-89747-688-1, Paperback ISBN = 978-0-89747-687-4

by David Doyle

The B-24 Liberator, produced by four different firms, in five different plants, was built in greater quantities than any other WWII bomber. Operated by the US Army Air Force, and US Navy on all fronts during the Second World War, and supplied to the British Commonwealth nations, the 18,482 Liberators took the war to the Axis doorstep. Lavishly illustrated with almost 250 authentic wartime photos, including over 80 in vintage colour, with supplemental drawings and colour profiles, this totally new edition of this classic In Action title brings to life no less than 20 variants these famed aircraft, as well as their crews. Experimental versions, classic bombers, freighters, tankers, reconnaissance birds - even the rare gunship version - are shown; 88 pages.

Hardcover ISBN = 978-0-89747-665-2, Paperback ISBN = 978-0-89747-664-5

Both hardcover and softcover are available now from Squadron/Signal Productions

New from Squadron/Signal in April

Doyle. Germany began developing its heavy armoured cars well before the outbreak of World War II. Germany's early six-wheel armoured cars were based on 6x4 truck chassis, and their off-road mobility was limited. These vehicles soon gave way to an expanding series of eight-wheel drive/eight-wheel steer vehicles fitted with a variety of armament. In time these too were supplanted by even larger armoured cars incorporating refinements based on lessons learned from the vehicles' field experience, such as heavier armour, armament, and an air-cooled engine. Packed with more than 220 period photographs, this book chronicles the development and deployment of Germany's six and eight-wheeled armoured cars before and during WWII; 80 pages.

Hilton. With its pressurized cabins for high-altitude operation, its long range, large bomb capacity, and turbo-supercharged engines, the B-29 Superfortress was the epitome of cutting edge American air power during WWII. The author, a photographer with the 40th Bomb Group and a veteran of 83 Superfortress missions, offers a first-hand, eye-witness account and shares his experiences on reconnaissance and bombing missions, flying the 'Hump' and taking off from an advanced base in Szechuan, China, to pummel Japanese occupation forces throughout Asia. Then in early 1945, the 40th BG moved to newly-liberated Tinian from which they took part in the final chapter of WWII - the aerial assault on the Japanese home islands. The book introduces you to fellow veterans of the 40th who relate their no-less extraordinary experiences - ditching in the Bay of Bengal, lost in the Siberian Taiga, downed behind enemy lines in China, taken prisoner after bailing out over Tokyo. Personal accounts from the men who served on the front lines of the air war in the Pacific, a unique primary historical source and a truly exciting read. Illustrated with over 100 photographs; 120 pages.

 Stapfer. By the end of World War II, the Jagdpanzer 38 Hetzer was the Wehrmacht's most widely used tank destroyer. Armed with the formidable Rheinmetall-Borsig Pak 39 L/48 7.5cm anti-tank gun the Hetzer served on both the Western and Eastern fronts. More than 2,800 Jagdpanzer 38s were built in just over one year - from April 1944 through May 1945 - far more than any other WWII German tank destroyer. This ground-breaking volume features detailed photos of early, medium, and late Hetzer variants and contains the first-ever published wartime photos of the vehicle's interior. Pictures of Jagdpanzer 38 vehicles in Bulgarian and Swiss service appear here for the first time, and the SK-23 steam-powered recovery vehicle based on the Hetzer is also documented along with extensive coverage of the G 13, including the first-ever colour photographs of that variant's interior. Illustrated with over 200 photographs, plus detailed line drawings, and colour profiles; 80 pages.

Both hardcover and softcover are available now from Squadron/Signal Productions